They think its all over… It isn’t

You may have noticed that this blog has been very quiet recently. That’s because, in the last two weeks, the largest excavation in Roman London’s history has come to a close. *cough* Pompeii of the North

The site was dug until archaeologists hit natural clay deposits (c) MOLA 2013

The site was dug until we hit natural clay deposits (c) MOLA 2013

But the lack of posts isn’t because we’ve been resting on our laurels; as the deadlines approached we’ve been working full-tilt to make sure everything was excavated, with teams of archaeologists working seven days a week and late into the night.

The trench by floodlight (c) MOLA 2013

The trench by floodlight (c) MOLA 2013

As we neared the finish line, our finds cabin was dismantled and our roof was taken away.

Typically, it rained the very next day (c) MOLA 2013

Typically, it rained the very next day (c) MOLA 2013

When everything was dug we packed up all of our tools, finds and paperwork ready to be taken back to the office.

Archaeologists and labourers leaving site (c) MOLA 2013

Archaeologists and labourers emerge blinking into the sunlight (c) MOLA 2013

The paperwork archive waits to be picked up (c) MOLA 2013

The paperwork archive waits to be picked up (c) MOLA 2013

The final load of equipment waits for the van (c) MOLA 2013

The final load of equipment waits for the van on Thursday afternoon (c) MOLA 2013

The van is loaded up with everything worth keeping (c) MOLA 2013

The van is loaded up with anything worth keeping (c) MOLA 2013

Unfortunately, the end of this huge dig means that many of the archaeologists who toiled here for so long are now out of work, as there are no other sites large enough take them on. Some have gone onto pastures new with other archaeological units, and some are taking a well earned break. It’s a bittersweet end to a fantastic excavation, but everyone is leaving with great memories.

Thanks for sticking with us for so long, but from everyone at MOLA this is Goodbye.

The team at the end of the dig (c) MOLA 2013

The team at the end of the dig (c) MOLA 2013

…Or is it?

Do you want to know what we found in those last frantic weeks? Do you want to see what happens to the finds once they leave site? Have you ever wondered what sort of strange and exotic people inhabit this mythical head office?

Excavation is only one part of what we do, so stick with us as we trade safety-boots for power-suits and head back to the office for the exciting post-excavation phase of this archaeological story!

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8 thoughts on “They think its all over… It isn’t

  1. well done; the only thing better than working on a big Walbrook site full of Roman timbers is reaching natural clay and knowing you’re finished and don’t need to do it again! does that top photo show an early Walbrook drainage channel cutting into the clay by any chance?

  2. Thanks for all the comments! We will definitely be continuing to post further blogs about new discoveries and interpretations.

    Peter, the top photo shows a large ditch running across the site, possibly for drainage. The last few weeks of excavation threw up a few of them, some with rather nice assemblages of pottery and metal finds. More to come about them in the future!

  3. YES! I do want to know what else you found in the last few weeks.

    Thank you so much for all the wonderful posts, which I have followed with fascination. They are an excellent example of how archaeology can be made available to the public, so that we can see the day-to-day work as well as the spectacular finds which get more publicity. Those more humble objects are the ones which really show how people lived, day-to-day.

    Thank you for taking the time to write such good posts, pitched at exactly the right level.

  4. Pingback: Post-excavation blues | Walbrook Discovery Programme

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